Legacy: 25 years of Social Justice Work

A new short film on our organizing and activism.

PSA from Carrie Mae Weems & The Peace Poets

Carrie Mae Weems partners with Bro/Sis and our alumni The Peace Poets to create a public health campaign – a PSA and billboards – focused on COVID.

Education, Covid, Race and America

With Pedro Noguera, Dean, Rossier School of Education, University of Southern California; Ana Oliveria, President & CEO, The NY Women’s Foundation; and Bro/Sis Executive Director Khary Lazarre-White

Our Response to The Coronavirus Crisis

Get updates on how Bro/Sis is responding to COVID-19, including our substantial emergency response and our return to in-person programming in July.

America - Protests, Pandemic & An Election

A conversation with Darrick Hamilton, Executive Director of the Kirwan Institute for the Study of Race and Ethnicity, Alondra Nelson, President, Social Science Research Council; Farah Griffin, Chair, Department of African American & African Diaspora Studies, Columbia University; and Bro/Sis Executive Director, Khary Lazarre-White .

Art & Activism: A Response To What We Are Facing In America

A conversation moderated by The Root’s Editor in Chief, Danielle Belton.

The Intersection of Race, Art, Social Justice, and Medicine

Bill T. Jones, Carrie Mae Weems and More to Take Part in Virtual Conversation on Race, Arts, and Social Justice..

Creating Changemakers

A black-led nonprofit in Harlem is keeping kids in school and out of trouble.

The help NYC children deserve:

Op Ed piece written by Liberation Program member Mendy Mendez Ventura

#BroSis25

Join with us as we celebrate 25 years of youth development and social justice!

Capital Campaign

On October 12th, 2018 The Brotherhood/Sister Sol broke ground on our new home.

Our Story

Watch this powerful 6-minute video, produced by 72andSunny, that premiered at our Voices 15 gala.

Who we are...

A video of the voices of the young people of Bro/Sis.

We Are Together

Bro/Sis alumni, The Peace Poets

Our Alumni and our Work

Words from alumni members of The Brotherhood/Sister Sol and the influences on their lives.

A Statement from The Brotherhood/Sister Sol

Protests have spread across this nation since the killing of George Floyd by Minneapolis police officers. Youth and staff of Bro/Sis have joined these protests and expressed our fury at yet another name being added to the long list of Black people killed by the police. Each an individual. Each beloved and mourned. Yet common circumstances of unnerving vicious repetition. The country is exploding with protests as every city has a similar list of Black and brown people killed by the police. Killed for being in our homes, for walking down the street, for riding in cars, for jogging, for being a child and playing in a playground, for sleeping in our beds.

Bro/Sis is a social justice youth development organization and for 25 years our staff and youth have protested such killings by the police here in NYC and organized for change. 

Bro/Sis has been centrally involved in the organizing movement to challenge and change the NYPD’s unconstitutional and widespread discriminatory use of “stop and frisk;” to end the discredited and racist policing practice known as “broken windows policing” that has resulted in so many deaths across the nation and filled jails and prisons; to change racially disparate enforcement of marijuana laws; to close the stain on our city that is Rikers Island; to demand an office of independent investigations and prosecutions of police violence and killings; and to remove the NYPD from our public schools.

We have constantly called attention to the profoundly unequal justice system in our nation. This system and the type of policing that feeds it are reflections of the larger society. Racism was central to the founding of this nation and continues to be deep seeded in all aspects of society – it is in the very air around us. We will continue, unfailingly, to do this work to counter systemic racism and to organize for a just and equitable America. It is the very reason Bro/Sis was founded – to support youth in comprehensive ways in response to the comprehensive inequities they face – and to help them to learn to change these conditions. We are tired – but we will keep moving. We will only be successful if people of good faith of all backgrounds and ethnicities, all who believe in justice and equity, join us and commit to this struggle.

Khary Lazarre-White 
Executive Director & Co-Founder

 

The Brotherhood/Sister Sol

Educational Programming, Training, Organizing for Social Change

Mission Statement

Founded in 1995, The Brotherhood/Sister Sol (Bro/Sis) provides comprehensive, holistic and long-term support services to youth who range in age from eight to twenty-two. Bro/Sis offers wrap around evidence-based programming.

The organization focuses on issues such as leadership development and educational achievement, sexual responsibility, sexism and misogyny, political education and social justice, Pan-African and Latinx history, and global awareness. Bro/Sis provides four-six year rites of passage programming, thorough five day a week after school care, school and home counseling, summer camps, job training and employment, college preparation, community organizing training, and international study programs to Africa, the Caribbean and South America.

Bro/Sis is unique in that we are locally based, yet with a national reach as we are: an evidence-based program that serves young people from economically poor communities and are seen as a model for the nation; we organize and advocate for social change; and we publish curricula and educate and train educators across the nation on our model.

Our Theory of Change is to provide multi-layered support, guidance, education and love to our membership, to teach them to have self-discipline and form order in their lives, and then to offer opportunities and access so that they may develop agency.

We rely heavily on the generosity of individuals and organizations to sustain our innovative programming.

Programs

Rites of Passage

The Brotherhood/Sister Sol’s Rites of Passage (ROP) Program is the foundation of the organization.

After School

Our After School Program provides an entry point for youth into our organization.

Summer Leadership

The Summer Leadership Program (SLP) provides an enriching environment when school is out.

College Advisory

College Advisory Program (or CAP) is our most formal approach to college preparation.

Capital Campaign

The Brotherhood/Sister Sol (Bro/Sis) is proud to announce that on October 12th, 2018 we broke ground on our new home. This 20,000 square foot capital project provides critical support to one of the leading citywide youth development organizations in New York City. This development allows for the creation of the necessary physical site for an organization that is being modeled across the country.

Completion is scheduled for the spring of 2021.

We have secured $18,300,000 in funding for this two-year $18,800,000  development and construction effort.

We need your help today to reach our goal of $18,800,000

The architectural firm of Urban Architectural Initiatives, designed the building and Gilbane Building Company, one of the largest privately held and family-owned construction companies in the field, is managing the project. Our government relations firm, one that has been critical to the success of this project, is Kasirer Consulting. The Board of Directors of Bro/Sis is deeply committed to this expansion and their advice and leadership has been critical to the success of the effort.

Upcoming Event

Education, Covid, Race and America

Monday, October 26th, 2020 – 6pm

FacebookLive

* Facebook account not required to watch

With Pedro Noguera, Dean, Rossier School of Education, University of Southern California; Ana Oliveira, President & CEO, The NY Women’s Foundation; and Bro/Sis Executive Director, Khary Lazarre-White.

Latest Post

Journalists, Actors, & Community Leaders Celebrate 25 Years of The Brotherhood/Sister Sol

Celebrating 25 Years of Bro/Sis’ transformational youth development work and social justice efforts.

The Brotherhood/Sister Sol’s Artistic Collaboration with The Peace Poets & visual artist Carrie Mae Weems on view at The Brooklyn Museum

Carrie Mae Weems: RESIST COVID TAKE 6! featuring Bro/Sis and The Peace Poets on view September 16 – November 8, 2020 at The Brooklyn Museum Plaza.

LEGO details new partnerships that support racial equality

LEGO has introduced a slate of new partners as it moves towards a commitment it made in June this year ‘to stand together with the Black community’ against racism and inequality. Over the summer, the Danish toy maker also stated it would donate to organisations dedicated to supporting Black children and educating all children about racial inequality.

Artwork at Brooklyn Museum brings awareness to coronavirus impact on minority communities

News 12 Brooklyn highlights Bro/Sis, The Peace Poets, & contemporary American artist Carrie Mae Weems artistic partnership.

The LEGO Group Announces New Partnerships That Support Racial Equality

In June 2020, the LEGO Group committed to stand together with the Black community against racism and inequality. Bro/Sis is one of its newest partners.

Brooklyn Artist, Social Justice Group Raise Coronavirus Awareness

PROSPECT HEIGHTS, BROOKLYN – A Brooklyn-based artist has collaborated with a Harlem youth development and social justice organization in a project that helps to increase public awareness to the disproportionate number of coronavirus cases that occur among communities of color.

Black Lives Matter Visual Arts Gallery

Black Lives Matter Visual Arts Gallery – Teen Summer Art Program 2020

Our Community – An exhibit by our 2020 Summer Day Camp

Our Community – An exhibit by our 2020 Summer Day Camp

BronxNet features The Brotherhood/Sister Sol in Bronx Social Justice & Anti Violence Forum

Join Bro/Sis organizers and activists for a discussion with BronxNet’s host Daren Jaime about the Liberation Program and the 20/20 campaign, pass the Marijuana Regulation and Tax Action Act (M.R.T.A.), and much more.

The Fears of Voting While Being an Immigrant American Citizen

No person is illegal on stolen land. All people must remember that the land we live on is wrongfully borrowed and stolen from Indigenous Native Americans. The United States has always carried the image that it is the “land of the free” and the  “land of opportunity.” Maybe the people of this country should start actually living by those accepting mottos rather than discriminating against those who are different and seek a better life.

Statistics

In NYC the general high school graduation rate of 70%; while the Schott Foundation found that the graduation rate of Black and Latino boys is 34%. Over 40% of Black men between the ages of 18-65 in New York City are unemployed.

90% of our alumni have graduated from high school, 95% either graduated from high school or earned their GED and 95% are working full time or enrolled in college.

Harlem’s teenaged pregnancy rate is 15% – our members have a rate of less than 2%.

With regards to issues of criminality and morality – after 20 years none of our members or alumni members are incarcerated and less than 1% have a felony conviction.